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The Agencies’ 3 Biggest Fears when Using Social Media Content

Social Media gives professionals and especially agencies an almost unlimited content source. But it is a source for content they rarely use – because of fear. And some of their fears are legitimate.   “Finding image content to complement your own content production is expensive and hard. At the same time there is a seemingly…

Social Media gives professionals and especially agencies an almost unlimited content source. But it is a source for content they rarely use – because of fear. And some of their fears are legitimate.

 

“Finding image content to complement your own content production is expensive and hard. At the same time there is a seemingly unlimited content source right in front of our noses – it’s called social media. Sadly we’re often unable to use it.”

Jonathan Gebauer, The Social Ms

 

Last week on Lobster blog we have discussed the 5 reasons to use social media photos and videos from real people at work, and how it makes them happy. This week we’d like to share the 3 biggest concerns that agencies and creative professionals have in common, when thinking about using social media content:

 

1. It’s illegal… Or I don’t know if it’s legal.

You are right. Most social media terms say that their user is the copyright owner, and that’s logical (even though the platform can use the photo for, say, advertising). Meaning you can admire, re-post and include it in a feed, but you can’t take a photo or video off the original account and use elsewhere without authors permission. But don’t stop reading here, next week we’ll discuss the tools to make it legal and, speaking bureaucracy,  – compliant.

 

2. It’s impossible to find what I need on social media.

Right, you have seen that ‘blooming spring flower in Florence’ somewhere, but how on Earth you are going to find it when sitting together your marketing director for the new collection campaign? As a matter of fact, many social networks today do not even filter by more than one keyword or tag at a time.

 

3. The quality is really (really) bad.

This comes from our point on the search, as it is impossible to filter out little gems from the noise, when there’s no good search. It is not to blame the users, as in the open space they have a right to share a useless photo out of self-expression (a selfie being the most common example). But time is work, so we want to make sure we spend as little time on searching around as we can, avoiding the mess of social.

These are the biggest fears of agencies and their reasons for not using social media content as much as they should.

Whether or not you’ll be able to address all or some of the issues actually depends on the tools you use for accessing it. For discussion on the tools to access Instagram, Flickr, Twitter, Vine and more, read our blog next week.

In the meantime, we invite you to send us your stories of the problems you had when using social media content (shoot them by e-mail at [email protected] or post on our Facebook page), – these will be featured next week too.

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