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Lobster Photographers’ Stories: Michael Moore, #SunLobster Winner

Last month, we held a competition looking for a variety of photographs depicting summer. Michael Moore, by public vote, was announced our winner of the ‘#SunLobster’ competition. Today, we’re sharing why he loves taking photographs of his son brushing his teeth.   My name is Michael Moore, I am a married father of two children…

Last month, we held a competition looking for a variety of photographs depicting summer. Michael Moore, by public vote, was announced our winner of the ‘#SunLobster’ competition. Today, we’re sharing why he loves taking photographs of his son brushing his teeth.

 

My name is Michael Moore, I am a married father of two children in their mid to late teens, one boy and one girl. I am in my mid-fifties and live in a medium sized town about half an hour north of London. I work as a cameraman and video editor; this is not as interesting as it might sound as I film railway track for numerous train operating companies who then use the footage for driver training. I do not really recall any specific dreams as a child, apart from a vague wish to one day work in an airport, and the ever popular one of becoming a pro footballer. I have a lifelong love of football and the team I support is Arsenal.

 

I would describe myself as a keen amateur photographer; I have an entry level full frame Nikon and a collection of lenses. My family and friends seem to like what I take and say I have a talent for it. I do not over analyse before I take a picture, and could not tell you what the “Rule of Thirds” is – I tend to just point and click. I show my photos on Flickr and Lobster and recently have sold a dozen or so through the Lobster marketplace.

 

“I like to capture the mundane, the things we do every day without even thinking about them.”

 

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I mainly shoot people, mostly family and generally in black and white. Low light photography is my favourite and I never use flash.  I like the slightly grainy filmic look of the 1960s which I try to emulate in some of my images. If such a one exists, the genre that my photography falls into would be family. A conventional family album but given a bit of a twist is another way to describe my photographic style.  What I like to capture is the mundane, the things we do every day without even thinking about them. The photo of a holiday home illustrates this perfectly; it is of my son cleaning his teeth before he goes to bed.

 

The birth of my children was the spur that got me seriously into photography, as like many new parents I wanted to document their growing up. Pre children, I used to take the odd holiday snap, but nothing more than that. I bought my first digital camera, a 3mp Fuji, in 2000 for an eye watering £700. It was an interesting camera whose body was designed by the car manufacturer, Porsche.

 

Photo 1

 

This photo was taken in a rented house whilst on holiday to celebrate a big family birthday. What you see here are my two children getting ready for bed in a separate annexe to the main house. I had observed them for a number of minutes from the main building and thought how interesting they looked illuminated and framed by the large windows. I thought this would make an unusual and different image, so I took it. I like the resulting image which brings back happy memories from a great weekend away.

 

In five years’ time, I see myself close to retirement.  If not actually retired, I hope to be working fewer hours. I have been working solidly since I was eighteen and am starting to feel a little worn out. A change of scene may be on the cards, perhaps relocation to the West Country to recharge the batteries and have the time to take more photos.

 

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What I believe is the future of social media:

 

Even with advances in technology it is hard to imagine how things can be improved upon greatly. With regard to small devices, we can already capture an image on our phone and are able to send it on instantly. What can be improved upon is image quality. The number of pixels on camera phones in the years to come will appear mind blowing to where we are now. This significant increase in quality is what I think will be the main change, as the technology for sharing images is already just about perfect. Soon anyone with a top end smart phone will have the ability to compete with the best photojournalists. I think this will be a force for the good.

 

A big thank you to Michael for his time and for sharing his story.

His photographs show the beautiful metamorphosis of his children, from young children to young adults, and the charm of ordinary life.
View them on Lobster.

 

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