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Cool, Calm, and Collected with Tao Wu

This is a series of blog posts dedicated to great photographers and videographers that are also contributing on Lobster. Read about the brilliant minds behind the camera, how photography and videography mingle with their life and the stories behind their best shots. Who is Tao Wu? When I was a child, I loved using my…

This is a series of blog posts dedicated to great photographers and videographers that are also contributing on Lobster. Read about the brilliant minds behind the camera, how photography and videography mingle with their life and the stories behind their best shots.

Who is Tao Wu?

When I was a child, I loved using my father’s Seagul DF-1 film camera to photograph anything in front of me. In that time (early 80’s in last century) camera and films were not affordable for a Chinese worker family, so he insisted recording family’s activities just like celebrations and travels was primary, but little by little I found my interest was not to record human activities but to create something. After shooting some landscapes occasionally, my father told me not to WASTE films! (Now I have to admit those photos are really really wastes.) This did not dispirit me, on the contrary, I believed that photographing landscapes was my interest.

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I bought my first DSLR Nikon D40 in 2009, by using it I can shoot anything I want at no cost. But holding a DSLR does not mean who can make their works art, without thinking and learning I just still wasted the shutter’s life.
Maybe because of my design career, my photos have a little more advantage in composition and colours than most people around me. In 2012, after travelling in Hongkong I saw some photographs shot by the same type camera in the same place on Flickr, those truly shocked me and even made wonder — Did we shoot the same Hongkong? From then on I began to self-learning photography and post-production skills, and I realized a photograph cannot have any connotation without proper thinking and skills.

The stories behind the best photos:

1.民以食为天

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I shot it through the window of a Japanese restaurant, the texts -民以食为天 on the back of Chef’s T-shirt means People take food as their prime want or  Hunger breeds discontentment.

2. Bristle Grass

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Harsh light cannot do any help with photos? I used it as a backlight to lighten the edges of bristlegrass to make them looks more soft and warm.

3. Unfooted Place in The Woods

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It’s a window of an ancient house constructed in Ming Dynasty in Xidi Village, Anhui, China. Now it is a cafe run by its owner.

4. Unfooted Place in The Woods

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After a blizzard, I walked into the woods alone, it was a little dangerous to walk under the trees because they and their branches covered very heavy snow and could break at any time, no one else wanted to go deeper, except me.

4. Terrace

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Shitan is a famous place known for its’ rape flower, after a heavy rain, the mist and clouds risen from the mountains which made the whole place look like a fairyland.

Favourite food for thought

When you are to photograph landscapes, remember to stay calm and try to feel the nature: the wind, the sound, the lights, etc, be synchronized with the environment.

Discover Tao Wu’s top 3 tips to improve your photography by joining our Lobster Community on Facebook

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